Monday, June 25, 2012

From Citizen Kane to Citizen Mayne

Ten years ago, online publisher Crikey under then owner Stephen Mayne fought a fruitless battle with the Howard government to win access to the budget lock-up in Canberra. Despite producing what  was unequivocally journalism, Mayne's operation was deemed not to be a media outlet. It's a snub our newly digitising established media companies might want to consider.

Monday, June 18, 2012

Death Notices

Many journalists, while naturally inquisitive about the world, have a curious blind-spot about the economics driving the industry supporting their trade. If only the public would buy newspapers again, they say, the advertisers would return and the industry would be saved. Yes, and if only kids would stop downloading music online, record stores might reappear.

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Deep Throaties

It's 9pm in the Daily Telegraph bunker and Gemma Jonestown is screaming herself hoarse.Her nationwide scoop about fatcat asylm seekers scoring free taxpayer-funded microwaves to heat up their 2-minute noodles is held up in production.

"For chrissake, Woodward and Bernstein would KILL for this story," she screams, between hurried sips of her Hungry Jacks large chocolate shake, "It's only a photo illustration, mate!"

Monday, June 11, 2012

Class Consciousness

The debate over media regulation has reached an impasse: In the one corner, the unrepresentative left-liberal academic elitist swill seeking to silence free media with their jackbooted authoritarianism; in the other, the free spirited and unshackled mavericks of the Murdoch media bravely speaking the people's truth to power.

It's a debate made for the professional underdogs of News Ltd - the nominally working class warriors who find their capitalist cultural identity at News Ltd. These tribal folk love nothing more than to scratch their class itch by throwing bombs at bourgeois academics who have "no idea how real people live" out in the fabled suburbs.

Sunday, June 3, 2012

Burying the Lead

Much of the discussion around the future of mainstream media journalism is about money. Who's going to pay the journos' salaries? What's a viable business model? Will the revenue generated by the erection of paywalls be sufficient to make up for the loss of audiences?